Lauson Small Engines

My Collection - Second Generation Engines - early group




LMC-192

Watch video of my LMC-192 in operation

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A Lauson LMC-192 with the Tillotson YA2A carburetor. These engines, for the most part, powered reel type lawn mowers. This is a 3/4 HP engine.

I acquired this engine at the "Old Threshers Reunion" show at the Denton Farm Park from a fellow collector. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


LMC-196

Watch video of my LMC-196 in operation

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A Lauson LMC-196 with the Tillotson MT-7A carburetor. These engines, for the most part, powered reel type lawn mowers. This is a 3/4 HP engine.

I acquired this engine from an ebay auction. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


"LMCish" Military Generator Set

See Additional information pertaining to this generator use

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Lauson did not provide a model number on this engine’s tag. I call it a “LMCish” Military Generator Set due to the numerous similarities the engine on this generator shares with the Lauson LMC. Though this engine and the LMC share many features, this engine is unique from the LMC in that it possesses an aluminum block, the block has more cooling fins than the LMC, the engine has a military style crankcase breather, and a shielded spark plug wire and spark plug. This engine also appears to have been built during World War II while the LMC was first brought to market in the late 1940’s after the war ended. In that regard, this military engine may be the pre-cursor to the commercial LMC?

The generator set was built for the Department of the Navy and if you’re interested in additional information regarding the use of this generator set, please follow the link above.

This engine and generator came to me in pristine condition, probably due to it still being stored in its carrying case where it’s protected from the bumps and dings it might have received otherwise. Its only been run the shortest of times; the spark plug only has a hint of carbon deposits: possibly from a factory test?

I acquired this engine from a fellow collector. I haven't run this engine, so I don't have a video of it in operation.


PA-172

Watch video of my PA-172 in operation

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I acquired this engine from a friend who had acquired it years ago from someone in the Chicago area. He could tell me nothing about the engine. Lauson literature does not mention a model type “PA”, so I've assumed that this engine was not built for commercial applications. The serial number on the tag infers that it was built during the war, possibly in 1942.

The engine has a Bendix-Stromberg carburetor. Lauson, to my knowledge, did not use these carburetors on their engines. I infer from this that Lauson probably delivered this engine without a carburetor to the intended vendor for it’s original use. This particular engine may have come out of surplus at the conclusion of the war, and the current carburetor (being a common one of that era) was probably adapted at that time.

My thoughts, from looking at this engine are that Lauson may have developed it for some war-time need, and after the war; the design was commercialized to become the Lauson PAC series.

I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


PAC-184

Watch video of my PAC-184 in operation

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The group of engines, starting with the PAC was the highest horsepower “small engines” that the Lauson Manufacturing Company produced. All these engines (PAC,PAH,PAX,P) have the same bore and stroke, at 2 7/8th in. x 2 ¾ in. The PAC was rated at 4 ¼ HP at 2700 RPM.

The PAC was first introduced after the war in 1946 and was replaced by the PAH in the early 1950's.

I acquired this engine through an eBay sale. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


PAX-300

Watch video of my PAX-300 in operation

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The PAX appears to be a PAC, equipped with an external magneto. The PAX was rated at 5 1/2 HP at 3200 RPM.

The PAX was first introduced after the war in the mid to late 1940's and was replaced by the P25 in the early 1950's.

I acquired this engine through the kind offer of a fellow collector. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RLA-219

Watch video of my RLA-219 in operation

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The RLA was first produced around 1935 and it's production period ends at the conclusion of WWII. The RL series (of which the RLA is a member along with the RLB, RLC, and RLE) are cast iron engines that have a four bolt head and are fairly small in size. The RLA produces ¾ HP.

The only examples I’ve seen of this engine so far appear to be military versions that have run generators and pumps.

I acquired this engine from an ebay auction. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RLC-14

Watch video of my RLC-14 in operation

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The civilian version of the RLA is the RLC. This engine enjoyed production up until the late 1940’s or early 1950’s. The RLC engines are equipped with either suction or float carburetors. This engine is equipped with a suction carburetor.

I acquired this engine from a contact I made in a Yahoo engine interest group. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RLC-156

Watch video of my RLC-156 in operation

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The same RLC model as above, but equipped with a float zenith carburetor.

I acquired this engine from an ebay auction. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


Goodall-RSC

Watch video of my Goodall RSC in operation

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The Goodall/Lauson engines were used exclusively by the “Goodall rotary cutter”. Actually, my collection contains two versions `of the Goodall/Lauson engine. The earlier RSC version can be seen here; the later RSH version can be seen below.

Goodall’s solution for providing lubrication for his early vertical shaft engines was to include an oil sump below the crankcase block and devise a way to inject oil from the sump into the crankcase. The Goodall engines differ from the Lauson RSV in that they incorporate a centrifugal oil pump in the oil sump to inject oil into the crankcase when the engine is running while the Lauson RSV incorporates a plunger driven oil pump.

The RSC Goodall used a re-tooled RSC block, while the RSH-775 Goodall used a re-tooled RSH block. My research indicates that Leonard Goodall performed the major engineering design work in the conversion of the horizontal shaft Lauson RSC to vertical operation and contracted Lauson to build these engines exclusively for the Goodall “rotary cutter”; therefore you will not see these engines on any mower other than a Goodall mower.

I acquired this engine from an eBay auction. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RSC unknown model

Watch video of this RSC in operation

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This little RSC is another engine that came to me with its own set of unanswered questions. It had no tag upon receipt and it matches no other RSC I’ve seen to help with an educated guess regarding its sub model designation. With its zenith carburetor I’d be tempted to call it an “early” RSC, but we already know that once a specific RSC model was established for a vendor, that model could be built throughout the build period of all RSC engines.

The most intriguing feature of this engine is it's 3/8 inch NPT pipe fitting for the exhaust manifold, where every other RSC I’ve seen has a ½ inch NPT thread. This feature, more than any other, leads me to believe this engine could be one of the earliest RSC’s produced.

The engine came, well used, and its useful days are over. Even with new rings the oil is quickly fouled. The strap around the blower housing is a repair someone did long ago, as is the brazing on the crankcase. The carburetor was broken off at the engine manifold, requiring the repair evident in it's pictures. No doubt its been worked hard and has had a hard life. Its retirement under my care will be far easier.

I acquired this engine from a fellow collector.


Sally Saw-RSC

Watch video of my RSC Sally Saw engine in operation

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The Lauson Sally Saw engine was used exclusively on the Sally Saw, produced by Cummings Machine works around 1946. The engine was not supplied with a Lauson tag or Identification. The engine is an aluminum block engine, the only aluminum block RSC to my knowledge built for commercial use (Lauson built many aluminum block RSC type engines for the military during WWII). The engine is unique in that it is an RSC type engine but built devoid of an oil pump and it has it’s own unique crankcase breather, not seen on other RSC type engines to my knowledge.

I acquired this engine from a Craig's list listing. I've included a picture of Sally Saw, the implement for which this engine was built.


RSC-514-7

Watch video of my RSC-514 in operation

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This version of the Lauson RSC was specifically built to operate a Stewart Warner Model 782 Aircraft Heater, a picture of which is shown on the left. The heater was used on the Catalina PBY flying boat and possibly other aircraft. The engine features a deep oil sump, probably to provide extended hours of operation between maintenance periods. The engine is devoid a governor and is built with a special magneto, used to fire not only the engine’s sparkplug but also a spark plug installed in the Stewart Warner heater’s burner. The engine itself drives the blower on the heater to force air through the heat exchanger. My understanding is that the aircraft heater was used in frigid climatic conditions to warm the aircraft engines prior to starting. Flexible ducting delivered this heated air to areas of need, probably to the engine nacelles.

Lauson does not list a carburetor for this engine and I believe they were supplied to Stewart Warner without one. Stewart Warner supercharged this engine with a roots supercharger when it was installed on the heater.

For exhibiting the engine, I’ve installed a sparkplug as would have been used in the Stewart Warner heater and I’ve included a neon sparkplug test tool so that spectators can see the auxiliary spark plug in operation. This second spark plug must be installed in the ignition circuit for the engine to run.

This specific RSC514 was probably sold out of military surplus at the conclusion of WWII.


RSC-586

Watch video of my RSC-586 in operation

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The RSC-586 is equipped with a gear reduction drive.

If ever an engine was saved from the scrap yard, this engine qualifies. This engine was the second Lauson to join my collection and it was a rusted hulk when I acquired it; I only considered renovating it because I thought it might be interesting to try to get it running. Upon close inspection, all the machined surfaces were free of corrosion and pitting. The engine was seized, but this was due to the bearings being rusted. I replaced the bearings, rings, coil, and condenser; and I made several parts, including the rope start pulley. I also had to fabricate a few parts to repair the oil pump. This engine, upon receipt, was badged as a RSC-703. It appears that long ago, the mounting flange for the carburetor was broken on this engine and a previous owner adapted a Zenith carburetor; to add insult to injury, the Zenith carburetor was damaged during shipment to me.

With the original Tillotson YA2A carburetor being replaced by a Zenith (Lauson part number 25260) this engine more closely resembles a RSC-586 so I have re-badged it as such. This engine is an excellent runner with it’s zenith carburetor and it gained my admiration when it started on the very first attempt after I rebuilt it, and to date it hasn’t failed to start on the first pull of the starting rope (as long as I don’t forget to open the gas valve).


RSC-591

Watch video of my RSC-591 in operation

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The RSC models are undoubtedly the most popular and prevalent of the Lausons you will find. Lauson built many sub-models of this series with the RSC591 appearing to be the base engine type. The RSC models were built with float or suction carburetion, with float carburetion being the most prevalent. The float carburetors were (mostly) the Tillotson ML series with the ML1B carburetor being very popular. Some of the (I presume early) RSC engines were built with a pipe nipple intake manifold to accept a screw-in zenith carburetor. Most of the extant engines, however, have a flange mount for the carburetor.

I acquired this engine at the Denton Farm Park "Old Fashoned Threshers Reunion" show many years ago. This engine is the first Lauson engine I acquired. It has a Montgomery Wards tag on it, and the Lauson name did not appear anywhere on the engine at the time I acquire it. I bought it because I liked the flat belt pulley that came with it; and I thought it looked unique with it’s cylindrical gas tank, sediment bowl, and classic block design. Later I identified it as a “Lauson”. I’m probably collecting Lausons today because I purchased this engine as opposed to the Briggs or Clinton I was also considering that day.


RSC-676

Watch video of my RSC-676 in operation
Access an article discussing the renovation of this engine

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I acquired this engine from a sale on the engineAds web site. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RSC-701

Watch video of my RSC-701 in operation

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This RSC engine was built specifically to power a Jari sickle-bar mower.

I acquired this engine from an ebay auction. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RSC-703

Watch video of my RSC-703 in operation

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The Lauson RSC703 was built for use on a Toro “Zipper” sickle-bar mower.

I purchased this engine off of Craig’s list. Things often look better in their pictures than they actually are and this engine is an example of that. It was thoroughly rusted and it took a lot of work to even get it apart. This is an engine that probably should have been parted out and relegated to my parts store, but I had purchased it with the idea of renovating it and I was well into that effort before it dawned on me that a renovation was probably not going to be cost justifiable.

This engine needed all new bearings, fortunately I had the crankcase bearings in my inventory; I did need to purchase the two gear reduction bearings.
Upon removing the valves I was dismayed to see that the exhaust valve seat was corroded beyond repair. This would normally result in the termination of the project, but I had a RSC591 block available for use and I only needed to drill and tap the PTO side of that block for adaptation of the gear-reduction unit. I also had a replacement exhaust valve in my inventory.
The magneto and condenser needed replaced, as well as the flywheel (several fins were broken).
I rarely find an oil pump that isn't servicable, but with this engine, the oil pump was beyond repair; the oil pump from the above RSC591 came to the rescue.
The sparkplug threads were corroded but a replacement cylinder head was available.
The necessity to replace all these parts nearly denuded my parts inventory but it did keep the renovation cose down.
Filling out the remainder were new rings, oil seals, and gaskets.
My biggest challenge was rebuilding the carburetor; it was corroded to such a degree that I could not disassemble it without drilling out all the screws and re-tapping the cover mounts. I was eventually able to free the throttle, but the choke butterfly was frozen fast and would not budge. I ended up milling out the butterfly, drilling out the shaft, and fabricating a new choke shaft and butterfly. After reaming the carburetor body for adaptation of the new choke shaft and installing the new parts I had an operational choke. The carburetor is still in very poor condition, and even with all these repairs, the operation of the carburetor is marginal, thus providing an inadequate supply of fuel/air mixture for the engine.
This carbuetor desprately needs a rebuild kit, but even if a rebuld kit were available for a Tillotson YA2A carburetor, I doubt I could remove the old jets in order to replace them

This engine runs, but not that well and it will probably spend most of it’s time silently on the engine stand at the shows, while those around it provide the action.

I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation.


RSM-826

Watch video of my RSM-826 in operation

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The Lauson RSM826 was built as an inboard marine engine.

I purchased this engine off of Craig’s list. I’m beginning to think that “Marine” is synonymous with “rust bucket”. I suspect some of these inboard marine engines were used in fresh water however this one was not and it’s outward appearance supported that premise. The engine came from the Boston area and though it doesn’t appear to have had a lot of use, it did spend a lot of time in and around salt water. I had high hopes of preserving the Arnolt clutch housing; but that wasn’t to be. No amount or combination of soaking, heating, and tapping would break the clutch housing loose from the output shaft. I ended up milling the clutch housing off the crankshaft and then filing the shaft smooth again.

The Lauson RSM is a standard RSC, adapted for marine use. It has a unique base with a deeper sump that normal and the carburetor, instead of bolting to the rear of the engine block; is attached with a short manifold that allows the engine to be mounted in a boat at a slight angle for direct coupling to the propellor shaft while the carburetor remains upright. The carburetor is a standard Tillotson ML1B. Being a boat engine, there is no governor. Other than these modifications, the engine shares the same attributes as a “standard” RSC, having an oil pump, ball bearing main bearings, connecting rod inserts, and other normal attributes of the quality built RSC.

This engine needed very little to get it running again. I replaced the broken starting pulley and the hopelessly corroded carburetor and I gave it a thorough cleaning and sandblasting to remove the external dirt and rust. After repainting and reassembly this engine started promptly and after a carburetor adjustment, it runs quite well.

I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after its renovation.


TLC-316-1

Watch video of my TLC-316-1 in operation

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This engine is a Salsbury Motor Scooter engine, built specifically for the model 74 Salsbury Motor Scooter.

I acquired this engine at the "Old Fashoned Threshers Reunion" at the Denton Farm Park in North Carolina. I provide a "before" picture of this engine as well as pictures of it after it's renovation. The air cleaner is of my own design and fabrication, and is not original to any Lauson engine.


TLC-349

Watch video of my TLC-349 in operation

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This engine is base model for the Lauson TLC. This engine is badged as Fairbanks Moose: thus the green tag. According to our build date algorithm; this engine should have been built in 1944- during the Second World War. To my knowledge, only war effort items were manufactured- though agricultural items were considered war effort. I’m wondering for what use it would have been built?


TLC-351

Watch video of my TLC-351 in operation

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I suspect this engine was purchased from military surplus at the conclusion of WWII. It came to me, painted in the manner that it currently is but I thoroughly cleaned the engine and gave it my normal disassembly treatment with inspection. It went back together, only needing a new set of piston rings and a new ignition condenser. The fuel pump required a rebuild but fortunately I found a supplier for a rebuild kit- complete with new diaphragm.

This engine is somewhat unique in that the block and attachments are aluminum, thus this is an aluminum TLC, when Lauson was building exclusively cast iron engines for commercial use. The engine has a cast iron cylinder sleeve and it sports ball bearing main bearings, connecting rod inserts, and all the other quality features for which Lauson was known.

The fuel pump also makes this engine somewhat unique, though it’s a standard AC type pump. The pump delivers quite a bit of pressure and stopping all the leaks was one of the more challenging aspects of this renovation.

Identifying what this engine might have been built to power for the military is anybody’s guess, though it has a tapered output shaft that could indicate it was built to power a generator. I’ll assume the original purchaser of this engine adapted the pulley that was on the engine when I acquire it.

I acquired this engine from a good friend who is also an engine collector.


TLC-366

Watch video of my TLC-366 in operation
Access an article discussing the renovation of this engine

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The TLC is a larger version of the RSC, producing 2.3 HP. The commercial versions of this engine were all cast iron. Alloy block versions of this engine appear to have been built for the military. The TLC was another popular series for Lauson, though not nearly as popular as the RS series.

The TLC was first built in 1937. Lauson also built many sub-models of this engine and they were built for a wide variety of uses. The engine sports a MS series Tillotson carburetor with the MS74J being a very popular carburetor for this engine. This specific TLC is equipped with a gear reduction unit.

I acquired this engine from an ebay auction.


TLM-826

Watch video of my TLM-826 in operation
Access an article discussing the renovation of this engine

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The TLM was built to be an inboard air cooled marine engine of 2.3 HP. The engine is built as a modified TLC; to be mounted on a slant for connection to a boat propeller shaft and stuffing box. The engine would have had a spark arrestor air cleaner when first sold and may well have been equipped with a marine transmission; if so, both air cleaner and transmission had been removed before I took possession of the engine. Many of these marine engines started their life in a boat, but then were re-tasked to other duties later in their life and at that time, many were stripped of their transmissions and air cleaners.

This engine came to me from a friend, Bill Chasser who restores Salsburry Motorscooters. He had originally purchased this engine off eBay with the intention of it being a “parts” engine for his motor scooter restorations. Upon receipt however, he realized that the engine was is excellent condition and could not bring himself to part the engine out as he originally intended. I ended up purchasing the engine from Bill.

The renovation of this engine is a topic in my “Essays on Assembling Engines” section of this site.


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